Author Archives: Jason Polak

For real? Atiyah's proof of the Riemann hypothesis

Well this is strange indeed: according to this New Scientist article published today, the famous Sir Michael Atiyah is supposed to talk this Monday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum. The topic: a proof of the Riemann hypothesis. The Riemann hypothesis states that the Riemann Zeta function defined by the analytic continuation of $\zeta(s) = \sum_{n=1}^\infty […]

Some 2018 Springer Math Texts

When I was a student at McGill I loved looking at the latest Springer texts in the now-nonexistant Rosenthall library. So, I thought that I'd list some of the cool looking titles that have come out in 2018: Walter Dittrick, Reassessing Riemann's Paper: This book is an analysis of Riemann's paper "On the Number of […]

Calculator Review: Casio FX-991MS

Some believe that if you're main profession is pure math research, you don't need a scientific calculator. That's simply not true. Although I don't use one nearly as much as when I was an undergrad, I still need a calculator and the only one I'm willing to use is the Casio FX-991MS.

My top nine favourite math texts

Here they are: Keith Devlin, The Joy of Sets If you're not a set theorist but want to understand set theory, this book is awesome and one of a kind. I have not read it all, but what I have read I can actually understand! Frank de Meyer and Edward Igraham, Separable Algebras over Commutative […]

On reasonably sure proofs

I happened to come across a 1993 opinion piece, Theorems for a price: Tomorrow's semi-rigorous mathematical culture by Doron Zeilberger. I think it's a rather fascinating document as it questions the future of mathematical proof. Its basic thesis is that some time in the future of mathematics, the expectation of proof will move to a […]

Abelian categories: examples and nonexamples

I've been talking a little about abelian categories these days. That's because I've been going over Weibel's An Introduction to Homological Algebra. It's a book I read before, and I still feel pretty confident about the material. This time, though, I think I'm going to explore a few different paths that I haven't really given […]

Book Review: Lost in Math by Hossenfelder

When it comes to the philosophy of science, not many publications are relevant to modern practice. Let's take math. The current literature still talks about platonism. Look harder and you might find the rise of non-Euclidean geometry or other breakthroughs like cardinality. In short, the bulk of mathematical philosophy still consists of math that's hundreds […]

Consider voting for this blog!

Update: Voting is now closed and the results of this contest will be announced on September 5, 2018. Update #2: Due to a typo in the email I got about the contest rules, the previous update was a mistake. It seems like you can still vote until the end of August! Update #3: Sadly, I […]