Here is an old classic from linear algebra: given an $ n\times n$ matrix $ A = (a_{ij})$, the determinant of $ A$ can be calculated using the permuation formula for the determinant:

$ \det(A) = \sum_{\sigma\in S_n} (-1)^\sigma a_{1\sigma(1)}\cdots a_{n\sigma(n)}$.

Here $ S_n$ denotes the permutation group on $ n$ symbols and $ (-1)^\sigma$ denotes the sign of the permutation $ \sigma$. The computation of the determinant is much more easily done via the ‘minor expansion method’, but this just reduces to the above formula. Now, typically we would never use the above formula to calculate the determinant, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t useful!

The Lie Algebra of an Algebraic Group

In fact, computating the Lie algebra of $ \mathrm{SL}_n$ over a fixed commutative ring $ k$ happens to be a quick and interesting application of the above determinant formula. First, let us recall the definition of the Lie algebra, or at least one of the many equivalent definitions. Consider the algebra of dual numbers, $ k[\tau]/(\tau^2)$. Each element in this algebra can be written uniquely as $ a + b\tau$: this gives a $ k$-algebra map $ C: k[\tau]/(\tau^2)\to k$ by sending $ a + b\tau$ to $ a$.
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Last time in this series, we saw the definition of the Lie algebra of a linear algebraic group $ G$ over a arbitrary field $ k$ as the set of differentiations $ f:k[G]\to k$; these are the $ k$-linear maps satisfying $ f(ab) = \epsilon(a)f(b) + f(a)\epsilon(b)$ where $ \epsilon:k[G]\to k$ is the counit morphism corresponding to the identity in $ G$.

In this post we will look at the geometric definition of the tangent space, which is natural when we consider the $ k$-points of $ G$ as a subset of affine space. Furthermore, we shall see an example of the adjoint representation, and how morphisms of algebraic groups correspond to morphisms of Lie algebras in the explicit case of $ G$ embedded into $ \rm{GL}_n$. This will allow us to write down an explicit formula for the adjoint representation.
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In Linear Algebraic Groups 2, we defined the Lie algebra of an algebraic group $ G$ to be the Lie algebra of all left-invariant derivations $ D:k[G]\to k[G]$ where $ k[G]$ is the representing algebra of $ G$. However, we were left trying to figure out exactly how a morphism $ \varphi:G\to H$ determines a morphism $ d\varphi:\mathcal{L}(G)\to\mathcal{L}(H)$. It turns out that the answer is slightly tricky, and thus the Lie algebra in terms of left-invariant derivations $ k[G]\to k[G]$ really can’t be the “real” or “most natural” definition!

Now, I could just give the formula for morphisms right away, but I think it would be a bit unmotivated. So before looking at the formula, let us first look at another way of defining the Lie algebra of an algebraic group. In fact, the next defintion is much more natural in that the functoriality of the Lie algebra construction will be clear, whereas in this case it was not.
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